Demonstrations

----________________ OCTOBER 17, 2002: GLOBAL DAY OF PROTESTS _BELOW


_
Coke to workers with AIDS in Africa:
_ "Drop Dead"

Coca-Cola executives think providing only 1.5% of their workers
in Africa with access to HIV/AIDS treatment and care is enough.

DEMAND COKE PROVIDE HEALTH CARE TO ALL HIV+ WORKERS IN AFRICA


APRIL 17th 2002 ~ New York City Rally

Coke only provides HIV/AIDS health care coverage to its 1,500 "direct employees," neglecting the rest of the 100,000 men and women who bottle and distribute Coke products under exclusive licensing agreements in Africa.

Meet at 11 am to protest Coke's deadly neglect for HIV+ workers in Africa--then join union activists for a rally against Coke's complicity in the face of murder and torture of union workers in Columbia.

Madison Square Garden Theater
_ 33rd St & 7th Ave
(Outside of Coca-Cola's Shareholder Meeting) To download the flyer for the rally: http://www.healthgap.org/A17flyer.pdf

****************************************************

Coke's Neglect = Death for African Workforce

Coke, the largest private employer in Africa, profits off workers faced with a health pandemic of unprecedented scale.

-- In 2001 alone, AIDS killed 2.3 million African people.

-- That same year, Coca-Cola's net operating revenues in Africa came to $621 million, the highest growth rates among all regions.

-- Coke's most profitable markets in the continent are in sub-Saharan Africa--where 26 million people are infected.

-- Every day 8,000 people with HIV/AIDS die because the life-sustaining antiretroviral medications that have dramatically improved the health of people with HIV in wealthy nations are out of reach.

-- 95% of the world's 40 million people with HIV do not have access to necessary treatment and care because multinational corporations and world leaders don't consider treating them to be "cost effective."

****************************************************

Stop Coke's deadly neglect.

STOP MEDICAL APARTHEID -- SIGN THE COMMUNITY LETTER TO CEO DAFT

Join ACT UP & Health GAP to demand Coke:

- Provide all 100,000 African workers and their dependents with comprehensive healthcare-including life-sustaining antiretroviral treatments.

- Offer confidential HIV testing and counseling to all workers, in the context of a clear anti-discrimination policy.

- Distribute free condoms in the workplace, and provide safer-sex and sexual health education classes.

- Develop further HIV/AIDS prevention and education policies in collaboration with affected employees, their labor representatives, and community-based health initiatives.

****************************************************

SIGN THE COMMUNITY LETTER TO COKE's CEO DOUGLAS DAFT1) Read the Letter
FIGHT FOR WORKERS & FAMILIES TO HAVE ACCESS TO HIV/AIDS TREATMENT
To download the flyer for the rally http://www.healthgap.org/A17flyer.pdf


ACT UP New York | Health GAP
June 12, 2002

AIDS ACTIVISTS CRASH GLOBAL BUSINESS COUNCIL GALA DEMAND COCA-COLA, OTHER MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS PAY FOR TREATMENT FOR AFRICAN WORKERS DYING WITH AIDS

Activists disrupt ceremony by land and by sea

(New York, New York) During multiple disruptions of the awards ceremony Wednesday June 12 of the Global Business Council on HIV/AIDS, members of the AIDS activist group ACT UP and Health GAP demanded multinational corporations like Coca-Cola pay for medicines for employees in developing countries facing death from untreated HIV disease.

While activists inside the gala interrupted the ceremony, confronting members of Anglo-American, Coca-Cola, and other companies with massive workforces in Africa, other ACT UP members chanted from bullhorns while floating alongside the gala at Pier 60 in a boat "Coke lies, workers die, AIDS treatment now!" The ceremony, sponsored by the Global Business Council on HIV/AIDS, was emceed by Dan Rather and attended by Kofi Annan, Bill Clinton, Dick Holbrooke, and other luminaries.

"Crumbs from Coca-Cola and other corporations for workers dying with AIDS are nothing to celebrate," said Sharonann Lynch of Health GAP and ACT UP New York. "Companies are patting themselves on the back, but they have skirted their most fundamental obligation-paying for treatment for their HIV positive workers."

At Coca-Cola's annual shareholder's meeting in April 2002 activists launched a campaign singling out the beverage company, the largest sole private sector employer in Africa, for their refusal to pay for HIV treatment for workers in their bottling and distribution facilities. Coca-Cola, despite its massive African employee base, has offered little more than billboard and truck space to African country governments for anti-AIDS advertisements and safe sex materials. Coca-Cola has only agreed to permit treatment access for a handful of HIV positive employees they consider their "direct employees."

"Multinational companies have no laurels to rest on," said ACT UP New York co-founder and HIV-positive activist Eric Sawyer. "Coca-Cola, Anglo-American and other members of the Global Business Council have reneged on their promises to provide antiretroviral treatment and care to their workers and their families. Medical apartheid is nothing to be proud of."

"How can Coke make so much profit from the labor of HIV positive employees but refuse to pay for AIDS medicines?" asked Amanda Lugg of ACT UP New York. "Africa is Coke's largest growth market. Coke's inaction is unconsionable."

As attendees dined inside, protesters knocked on the windows, held up signs, and chanted names of companies that had shirked their responsibility in paying for workplace treatment. "Last year Coca-Cola and Anglo-American grabbed headlines with announcements of workplace initiatives. In the past twelve months, Anglo-American has reneged twice on its treatment policy, while Coca-Cola has failed to treat its workers and their families," said protester Eustacia Smith of ACT UP New York. "Meanwhile there are 8,000 deaths and 14,000 new HIV infections every day."


June 12, 2002
ACT UP New York · Health GAP

Global Business Council on HIV/AIDS
Awards Gala Ploy to Detract from Inaction
on Global AIDS Disaster, say AIDS Activists

(New York, New York) During multiple disruptions of the awards ceremony Wednesday June 12 of the Global Business Council on HIV/AIDS, members of the AIDS activist group ACT UP and Health GAP demanded multinational corporations like Coca-Cola pay for medicines for employees in developing countries facing death from untreated HIV disease.

While activists inside the gala interrupted the ceremony, confronting members of Anglo-American, Coca-Cola, and other companies with massive workforces in Africa, other ACT UP members chanted from bullhorns while floating alongside the gala at Pier 60 in a boat "Coke lies, workers die, AIDS treatment now!" The ceremony, sponsored by the Global Business Council on HIV/AIDS, was emceed by Dan Rather and attended by Kofi Annan, Bill Clinton, Dick Holbrooke, and other luminaries.

"Crumbs from Coca-Cola and other corporations for workers dying with AIDS are nothing to celebrate," said Sharonann Lynch of Health GAP and ACT UP New York. "Companies are patting themselves on the back, but they have skirted their most fundamental obligation-paying for treatment for their HIV positive workers."

At Coca-Cola's annual shareholder's meeting in April 2002 activists launched a campaign singling out the beverage company, the largest sole private sector employer in Africa, for their refusal to pay for HIV treatment for workers in their bottling and distribution facilities. Coca-Cola, despite its massive African employee base, has offered little more than billboard and truck space to African country governments for anti-AIDS advertisements and safe sex materials. Coca-Cola has only agreed to permit treatment access for a handful of HIV positive employees they consider their "direct employees."

"Multinational companies have no laurels to rest on," said ACT UP New York co-founder and HIV-positive activist Eric Sawyer. "Coca-Cola, Anglo-American and other members of the Global Business Council have reneged on their promises to provide antiretroviral treatment and care to their workers and their families. Medical apartheid is nothing to be proud of."

"How can Coke make so much profit from the labor of HIV positive employees but refuse to pay for AIDS medicines?" asked Amanda Lugg of ACT UP New York. "Africa is Coke's largest growth market. Coke's inaction is unconsionable."

As attendees dined inside, protesters knocked on the windows, held up signs, and chanted names of companies that had shirked their responsibility in paying for workplace treatment. "Last year Coca-Cola and Anglo-American grabbed headlines with announcements of workplace initiatives. In the past twelve months, Anglo-American has reneged twice on its treatment policy, while Coca-Cola has failed to treat its workers and their families," said protester Eustacia Smith of ACT UP New York. "Meanwhile there are 8,000 deaths and 14,000 new HIV infections every day."


OCTOBER 17, 2002---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- [see top of page]

GLOBAL DAY OF PROTEST AGAINST CORPORATIONS DENYING AIDS DRUGS

ACT UP and AIDS activists around the globe demanded Coca-Cola and other multinational corporations pay for AIDS treatment for workers living with HIV/AIDS in developing countries. An international coalition of activists--from Accra to Manhattan, from Casablanca to Oakland, from Harare to Atlanta--targeted Coca-Cola with simultaneous protests, pickets, press conferences, mmarches and more on October 17, for Coke's refusal to pay for HIV medicines for sick workers in developing countries, particularly African countries.


Global Day of Protest

Thursday, October 17, 2002

STOP MEDICAL APARTHEID -- FIGHT FOR AIDS TREATMENT FOR WORKERS

New York City RALLY
Coke's NYC Headquarters @ 2PM
711 Fifth Ave. between 55th &56th Street

AIDS activists leading a global campaign to pressure multinational corporations to pay for AIDS treatment for workers in developing countries today criticized Coca-Cola's initiative to enroll African bottlers in a cost-sharing program to provide HIV/AIDS care benefits to workers. Activists raised concerns over the scope, timing, and sustainability of the Coke initiative, claiming it fails to provide affordable and equitable access to AIDS treatment for workers and their dependents.

"Even as a first step, the plan leaves the majority of Coke's workers and their dependents in a deadly lurch," said Sharonann Lynch of Health GAP. "Fifteen months have passed since Coke first claimed it would negotiate with bottlers to cover AIDS drugs. Coke's glacial pace contradicts the company's rhetoric of compassion and action and makes us deeply skeptical about the rollout of the announced treatment program."

While the activists welcome the company's admission that the provision of AIDS treatment, including antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, for bottlers is a fundamental company responsibility, they claim that Coke's plans will be implemented too slowly, and that the framework will only suit the largest bottlers---leaving the majority of workers in the hardest hit regions and the smaller bottlers behind.

Coca-Cola first gained attention when it announced in June 2001 that its 1500-person so-called "direct workforce" in Africa would be eligible for HIV treatment. Critics have charged the company with hiding behind its labyrinthine African franchise system to resist covering its total workforce, which totaled 100,000 workers at the time of the announcement. Today's announced initiative will cover just 35% of Coke's bottler workforce in Africa.

Activists speculate that Coke's 50% cost-sharing scheme with bottlers will delay the rollout of a treatment program with the numerous smaller bottlers that compose the rest of the Coke system. "The same cost-sharing scheme won't work for small and medium-sized bottlers. They can't foot the bill, and shouldn't be expected to," said Allison Dinsmore of Health GAP."

The bottlers are worried about paying for the high cost of treatment over the long-term. This concern is particularly acute since Coke has already announced its intent to withdraw from the program over time as the prices of drugs decreases, leaving workers and bottlers to foot the entire bill.

Activists also warn that the partnership with GlaxoSmithKline and PharmAccess International, which will apparently exclude purchases of lowest cost quality generic AIDS drugs, will mean that fewer workers will be able to afford treatment.

"Workers are too poor to cover of a 10 per cent co-payment on medicines, particularly at Big Pharma prices," said Asia Russell of Health GAP. "Coke, on the other hand, can easily bear the cost of subsidizing treatment in Africa--it's operating profit margin in Africa is twice that in North America. We demand that workers not be forced to pay for treatment and that Coke bring generic companies to the negotiating table."

Activists also charge Coke with putting its profits above the lives of people with AIDS by refusing to extend coverage to children and dependents of workers other than spouses. "The prospect of parents taking life-saving medicines while their HIV-infected children die is inexplicable and indefensible," said Brook Baker of Health GAP. "Coke should treat whole families, not just fathers and mothers."

Activists criticized Coca-Cola's for its failure to commit to provide treatment for workers in poor areas outside of Africa. "Coke employes hundreds of thousands of other system workers worldwide in developing countries," said John Riley of ACT UP New York. "Given the explosive epidemics in India, South East Asia, and Latin America, Coke's solution should be global, not just where activists have turned up the heat the highest."

"When it comes to bad faith and people with AIDS, Coke is neck and neck with Big Pharma," said Eustacia Smith of ACT UP New York.

Coke's announcement comes just three weeks before a day of international protests on October 17, 2002, against Coca-Cola for the company's refusal to pay for AIDS treatment for workers in developing countries, planned by an international coalition of AIDS groups (see list below). Protests are scheduled to take place in multiple cities and on major college campuses in the U.S. Events are also planned in South Africa, Ghana, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Morocco, and several other African countries, as well as in Thailand, Canada, Portugal, Japan, Norway, India, UK, and France.

_Endorsements:

ACT UP/Atlanta
ACT UP/East Bay, (USA)
ACT UP/New York, (USA)
ACT UP/Philadelphia, (USA)
ACT UP/Cleveland (USA)
ACT UP/Paris, (France)
Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA)
Africa Action (USA)
Africa Japan Forum (Japan)
African Services Committee (USA)
Aids Action Baltimore (USA)
Aids Action Baltimore, Baltimore, Md (USA)
AIDS Alliance in Nigeria, NIGERIA
Aids Healthcare Foundation (USA)
Alliance For Justice: Medical Mission Sisters, Wash. Dc (USA)
American Friends Service Committee Pmr (USA)
American Jewish World Service (USA)
American Medical Students Association (USA)
Artists Against Aids Worldwide
Association Marocaine De Lutte Contre Le Sida(Association Fighting Aids), (Morocco)
Bayou La Rose (USA)
Berkeley Gray Panthers, (USA)
Berkeley Vice Mayor Maudelle Shirek
Bread And Roses Community Fund (USA)
California Newsreel (USA)
California Nurses Association (USA)
Canadian Treatment Action Council (Ctac) (Canada)
City Councilor Kriss Worthington (USA)
Connecticut Peace Coalition/ New Haven (USA)
Conscious Movements Collective, Nyc (USA)
Councillors Kriss Worthington, Berkeley (USA)
Councillors Linda Maio, Berkeley (USA)
Councillors Margaret Breland, Berkeley (USA)
Deseret International Foundation Namibia (Namibia)
Disciples Peace Fellowship (Usa)
Drop-In Center For People Living With Aids, New Britain, Ct (USA)
East Bay Community Law Center, Berkeley (USA)
Ecology Center (USA)
Essential Action Wash. Dc (USA)
European Aids Treatment Group,
Fiar (Foundation For Integrative Aids Research), Brooklyn, Ny (USA)
First Congregational Church Of Oakland, Oakland, Ca (USA)
Food First, USA
Freedom Foundation-India (India)
Ganismo Para O Desenvolvimento Socio-Economico Integrado (Mozambique)
GAT - Grupo Português de Activistas sobre Tratamentos de VIH/SIDA
Global Aids Alliance, (USA)
Global Campaign For Microbicides (USA)
Global Exchange, Sf (USA)
Global- Gay, Lesbian, Or Bisexual Alliance (Student Organization At Uh) (USA)
Global Sweatshop Coalition_(USA)
Green Students For Environmental Awareness, Philadelphia, Pa (USA)
Gri Charitable Foundation (USA)
Harm Reduction Coalition, Nyc (USA)
Hayward City Councilor Kevin Dowling (USA)
Health Gap, (USA)
Indy Design (Canada)
Institute For Agriculture And Trade Policy (USA)
International Action Center (USA)
International Gay And Lesbian Human Rights Commission (Iglhrc) (USA)
International Labor Rights Fund (USA)
Jubilee Northwest Coalition (Usa)
Kaippg/International, Barrington, Ri (USA)
Kenya Association Of Forest Users (Kenya)
Kenya Association Of Forest Users, Nairobi(Kenya)
Lironga Eparu (Namibia)
Lungujja Womenís Association (Uganda)
Management Communication (Germany)
Médecins Sans Frontières, Luxembourg
Michigan Pwa Task Force (USA)
Middle East Childrens Alliance, (USA)
Millsaps College Cmt Aids Awareness Task Group (USA)
Mother Africa And Child Care Org/Ghanet/Plwhas (Ghana)
Nadir Hiv Treatment Group, Italian Community Advisory Board, Bologna (Italy)
Northwest Coalition For Aids Treatment In Africa(USA)
Nyc Aids Housing Network, Ny (USA)
Philadelphia Chapter, Coalition Of Labor Union Women (Cluw) (USA) Prakritajan. (Bangladesh)
Project Teach, (USA)
Queer Youth Training Collaborative (USA)
Resources For Survival, (USA)
San Francisco Bay View, (USA)
Sf Bay Area Jubilee Debt Cancellation Coalition (USA)
SF Supervisor Tom Ammiano, USA
Soja - Students Organizing For Justice In The Americas, Oakland, Ca (USA)
Student Global Aids Campaign,(USA)
Students For Global Public Health (USA)
Survive Aids, San Francisco, Ca (USA)
The Center (Zimbabwe)
The Thai Network Of People Living With Hiv (Tnp+), (Thailand)
Treatment Action Campaign (South Africa),
University Of The Witwatersrand Faculty Of Health Sciences, (South Africa)
University of Vermont: Students for Peace and Global Justice, USA
Ursuline of Tildonk for Justice and Peace, USA
Ursuline Sisters of Tildonk, US Province, USA
Vote Health, Oakland, Ca (USA)
Vso Mozambique, Maputo (Mozambique)
World-Women Organized To Respond To Life Threatening Diseases, Oakland, Ca (USA)
Yale Aids Network (USA)
Zimbabwe Aids Network (Zan) (Zimbabwe)


STOP MEDICAL APARTHEID -- FIGHT FOR AIDS TREATMENT FOR WORKERS -

OCTOBER 17, 2002
GLOBAL DAY OF PROTEST AGAINST CORPORATIONS DENYING AIDS DRUGS

DE-BUNKING COKE'S "NON-PLAN"

After many months of campaigning, Coke is starting to give in to activist pressure.

AIDS activists have been demanding that the company pay for HIV drugs and treatment for workers living with HIV among the 100,000 people who bottle and distribute Coke-not just Coke's so-called "direct workforce" of 1500 people.

On September 29, 2002, Coke announced they planned to start an initiative to share the costs of AIDS treatment with 8 of 40 bottlers in Africa. These 8 participating bottlers are some of the largest in Africa, and several already have insurance plans of their own.

Activists are concerned about Coke's commitment to extending a workable plan quickly to the many smaller bottlers starting medicines schemes from scratch. The devil is in the details, and the details from Coke are not forthcoming.

- Coke will demand workers contribute a 10% co-payment on drugs. Activists point out this is Coke's cynical ploy to drive down use of the program by creating barriers to access. Workers can't afford a co-payment and won't use the program. Coke on the other hand can easily afford the cost of the co-pay-marginal for them.

- Coke isn't committing to buying from multiple drug suppliers. Maximum benefit for workers comes from drugs procured at the cheapest price. That means negotiating price with multiple companies, including generic producers. When will Coke publicly commit to using generic competition to ensure maximum coverage of workers?

- What about the family? Children of workers aren't covered under the current plan-only the worker and one spouse. Coke must not be allowed to leave the HIV-positive children of workers behind.

- What about the rest of the world? Coke's workplace policies in Africa are less than perfect. But in the rest of the developing world, they are worse. Coke workers in regions hard-hit by AIDS need comprehensive treatment, prevention and care programs-including access to antiretroviral drugs

DEMANDS

We demand that Coca-Cola and other multinational corporations operating in developing countries:

* Provide all workers and their dependents with comprehensive healthcare - including life-sustaining antiretroviral treatments.

* Offer confidential HIV testing and counseling to all workers, in the context of a clear anti-discrimination policy.

* Distribute free condoms in the workplace, and provide safer-sex and sexual health education classes.

* Develop further HIV/AIDS prevention and education policies in collaboration with affected employees, their labor representatives, and community-based health initiatives.

***********************************************************************

MORE INFORMATION

Tel: 1-212-674-9598, email: info@healthgap.org
Go to: http://www.treat-your-workers.org for information and resources:

- fact sheet on Coke and workers living HIV/AIDS
- updated list of endorsers and campaign materials
- activist toolkits for students, non-students
- growing list of events, protests

TAKE ACTION: TELL COKE EXECUTIVES TO PROVIDE AIDS TREATMENT FOR ALL OF THEIR HIV+ WORKERS IN AFRICA

Write, Fax, and Call Coca-Cola today:

- Phone: 404-676-4971 or Fax: 404-515-2226
- Download and fax in the community letter to Coke's CEO Doug Daft: www.treat-your-workers.org

Coke's neglect = death for African workforce

Coke, the largest private employer in Africa, profits off workers faced with a health pandemic of unprecedented scale.

-- In 2001 alone, AIDS killed 2.3 million African people.

-- That same year, Coca-Cola's net operating revenues in Africa came to $621 million, the highest growth rates among all regions.

-- Coke's most profitable markets in the continent are in sub-Saharan Africa--where 26 million people are infected.

-- Every day 8,000 people with HIV/AIDS die because the life-sustaining antiretroviral medications that have dramatically improved the health of people with HIV in wealthy nations are out of reach.

-- 95% of the world's 40 million people with HIV do not have access to necessary treatment and care because multinational corporations and world leaders don't consider treating them to be "cost effective."

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Download Flyer http://www.treat-your-workers.org/fact.pdf

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STOP MEDICAL APARTHEID -- SIGN THE COMMUNITY LETTER TO CEO DAFT

Join ACT UP & Health GAP to demand Coke:

- Provide all 100,000 African workers and their dependents with comprehensive healthcareúincluding life-sustaining antiretroviral treatments.

- Offer confidential HIV testing and counseling to all workers, in the context of a clear anti-discrimination policy.

- Distribute free condoms in the workplace, and provide safer-sex and sexual health education classes.

- Develop further HIV/AIDS prevention and education policies in collaboration with affected employees, their labor representatives, and community-based health initiatives. For the full set of demands, read the community letter to CEO Douglas Daft

FIGHT FOR WORKERS & FAMILIES TO HAVE ACCESS TO HIV/AIDS TREATMENT

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
http://www.treat-your-workers.org/
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.OTHER RECENT ACTIONS AGAINST COCA-COLA

* August 12, 2002 (Manhattan) The AIDS activist groups ACT UP and Health GAP, who have been leading campaigns demanding multinational corporations like Coca Cola for AIDS treatment for African employees, offered provisional support for today's announcement from De Beers Consolidated Mines, and Anglo-American's recent announcement, committing the companies to treating its HIV positive workers. Activists announce a Global Day of Protest against corporations denying AIDS drugs. Press Statement

* July 10, 2002 (Barcelona) AIDS activists protest Coke's deadly neglect of workers with AIDS in developing countries. Groups call for "Global Day of Action"-coordinated protests in the US, EU, Africa and southeast Asia. Press Statement

* 30 JUNE 2002 (New York) ACT UP New York Target Coca-Cola at New York Gay Pride Parade to demand Coke pay for AIDS drugs for workers in poor countries. ACT UP New York Press Release

* JUNE 12, 2002 (Manhattan) ACT UP New York crash Global Business Council gala to demand Coca-Cola and other multinational corporations pay for treatment for workers living with HIV/AIDS. Activists disrupt ceremony, attended by Kofi Annan, Bill Clinton, and other dignataria by land, and by sea. Press Statement

* 17 APRIL 2002 (Manhattan) AIDS activists target Coca-Cola's annual shareholder meeting for refusing HIV/AIDS treatment for workers and their dependents in Africa. Coke's policy excludes all but the smallest fraction of African employees with access to treatment. Rally press advisory | Health GAP Floor Statements



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